Red Rocks and a Sandstone Wonderland.

We are back in Arizona after a week in Albuquerque wrapping up errands. ABQ treated us well altho the temps dropped well below freezing every night. The truck is serviced, Amazon packages collected, Trader Joe’s stocked, and now we are ready to get back on the road and see more amazing stuff.

Petroglyph National Monument

Before leaving New Mexico, I wanted to check out the petroglyphs. It was a quick and interesting trek. The monument exists around some residential areas so it didn’t take long to hike around the rocks to see what the ancient humans left behind as evidence of their existence. This was probably the least interesting experience I’ve had so far but I made it a point to see before leaving ABQ.

Petrified Forest National Park

After crossing back into Arizona, we stopped here for a quick lunch and hike. It was pretty fascinating to see the ancient crystallized trees laying all over the desert landscape. Like an ancient battlefield from a different era.

Wandering around the Crystal Forest.

Sedona, AZ

This was the next big destination that I was looking so forward to visiting. Sedona looks like it should be a National Park and it’s amazing that it’s actually just a regular place where people live and you can shop at Whole Foods surrounded by a stunning landscape.

First scene as we were driving into Sedona.
The town from the Airport trail.
Just hiking around soaking up the sunshine and views.
Famous church of the holy cross.
Walkway to the church entrance.
And, inside the church.

I did a few hikes around the area but most of the popular trails were mobbed with likeminded people so I had to forfeit a few destinations.

After 4 amazing days at Rancho Sedona RV Park, it was time to leave and even as we were driving away I couldn’t stop looking at the scenery and taking one last photo out the truck window.

Grand Canyon National Park

As we were driving north, we did a quick side-trip to the Grand Canyon South Rim. It wasn’t on the itinerary but when I saw the signs pointing the way I took the exit and spent a few hours in the park. There were only two places that would accommodate parking the Airstream – the Visitor Center and The Watchtower. I did snag a pull-out spot right along the rim to stop and take a pic. It was super windy and super cold so I didn’t spend much time wandering around outside. I would like to come back sometime and explore the canyon hikes.

Lake Powell – Glen Canyon National Recreation Area

After the Grand Canyon side-trip, and just before sundown, we arrived at our next destination – Lake Powell. This place is just magical to me. I don’t know what it is, maybe the strange sandstone formations, or the fact that it’s like an alien landscape. The lake is really low, so low they claim it’s only 30% full and there is no real hope that it would ever reach 100% again.

These monoliths and formations have not been seen since the lake was filled.
You can clearly see the water line where the lake used to be.
Lake Powell slowly disappearing.
Our camping spot “F18” for 4 days of exploring this interesting area.

Upper Antelope Canyon

Wow, just wow! It’s stunning what thousands and thousands of years of wind and water can create when used against sandstone. The Navajo Nation operates the tours to the canyon because the land is owned by members of the Nation. And, they required us to wear masks at all times, even outdoors. But that did not take away from the awe I felt being inside the canyon. All the pics I took were with my iPhone 12 Pro Max using the Vivid Warm setting.

These are the trucks you ride in for the 4 mile drive to the canyon entrance.

Arriving at the canyon entrance was a bit like an Indian Jones scene. Here’s a video of the entrance,

Once inside, it’s all about getting the right photo angles to provide the most dramatic effect as the sun streams in and casts light on the sandstone canyon walls.

“The Candle”
“The Heart”
This is the “Arizona Sunset” shot looking up from the canyon floor to the sky. The shadows and the exposure setting gave my iPhone this mazing shot.

The place is very popular and I imagine makes a lot of money for the Navajo family that owns the land – my ticket cost $200. But, it was such an awesome experience to see and capture the once in a lifetime images.

Horseshoe Bend

Next stop on the list was Horseshoe Bend which is the famous meander in Marble Canyon the Colorado River takes as it leaves Lake Powell and makes its way towards the Grand Canyon.

I literally walked up to the edge and took this video looking over the cliff. I am scared of heights so this was a bit intense for me tbh.

Marble Canyon

Home to the Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River which formed Lake Powell. I really wanted to take the Dam Tour but the damn tour and visitor center has been closed since stupid COVID. Best I could do was take these pics from the visitor center and the lookout. Pretty awesome nonetheless.

One last look at the bridge as we leave Arizona for Utah.

And that concludes our amazing time in Arizona. It was amazing. I love the state parks and the painted deserts. But now, we pack up and hit the road west towards Utah.

Kanab, UT

First stop in Utah is Kanab where we get ready to head into the splendor that Southern Utah has to offer. I found this perfect little boutique campground that had the best sunsets and nighttime start gazing.

Space 17 at Dark Sky RV Campground

So, that was a lot … we’ve been busy and there is much more to come as we cross our three month milestone of this Airstream Adventure. The upcoming weeks will be spent in the Utah National Parks marveling at God’s creation.

Next stop … Zion National Park.

3 thoughts on “Red Rocks and a Sandstone Wonderland.

  1. Loved the pic so much! Especially the Indian owned ones! Sooo worth $200❣️ How did they form and what kind of rock is it? I’m still in awe of the pic looking up at the sky at sundown I think? OMG just magnificent 😊 Utah pics should be incredible too. Hugs Darcy

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s